The Kurdish Immigrants Who Built Israel

Posted on January 22nd, 2018
By Lauren S. Marcus for The Forward


In Israel, there is often a singular narrative told about immigration and the creation of the Jewish state: Ashkenazi pioneers came from Eastern Europe at the end of the 19th century and built the country. They established kibbutzim, moshavim, and cities like Rishon LeTzion, and created pre-IDF militias. Streets in every city in Israel bear their names: Jabotinsky, Trumpeldor, Weizmann.

The Mizrahim came later, the narrative explains, in massive waves in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Refugees arriving long after the establishment of the state, they languished in ma’abarot and development towns.

But the story of one Kurdish Jewish family disrupts this narrative.

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Why Many American Jews Are Becoming Indifferent or Even Hostile to Israel

Posted on January 15th, 2018
By Daniel Gordis for Mosaic


It’s not about what Israel does. It’s about what, to their minds, Israel is.


All told, the two Jewish communities of the United States and Israel constitute some 85 percent of the world’s Jews. Although other communities around the globe remain significant for their size or other qualities, the future of world Jewry will likely be shaped by the two largest populations—and by the relationship between them. For that reason alone, the waning of attachment to Israel among American Jews, especially but not exclusively younger American Jews, has rightly become a central focus of concern for religious and communal leaders, thinkers, and planners in both countries.

True, other concerns have lately encroached: concerns in both countries, for instance, over the Trump administration’s still-developing stance toward the Israel-Palestinian conflict and, in the U.S., over a seemingly homegrown series of anti-Semitic acts of vandalism and bomb threats against Jewish institutions (most of the latter exposed as the work of a disturbed Israeli Jewish youth). But the larger worry—American Jewish disaffection from Israel—remains very much in place, and its reverberating implications were underscored during the waning days of the Obama administration, when by far the greater portion of American Jews stayed faithful to the president and his party even after his decision to allow passage of an undeniably anti-Israel resolution at the United Nations.

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Whose Jerusalem?

Posted on January 8th, 2018
BY LILI KALISH GERSCH for myjewishlearning.com 


A history of Jerusalem since Israel's establishment.


Following the 1948 War of Independence, the Israelis declared military control over West Jerusalem, extending the law of Israel to the territory for purposes of administration. Palestinian notables called on King Abdullah of Transjordan to annex eastern Jerusalem, and meetings with the Israelis were arranged in order to discuss the terms of the truce and perhaps plan for a peace agreement. While a peace agreement was not reached, Israel and Transjordan did sign an armistice agreement in April of 1949, freezing the borders of Jerusalem and formalizing the partition of the city.

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The Sulzberger family: A complicated Jewish legacy at The New York Times

Posted on January 1st, 2018
By Josefin Dolsten for JTA


On Thursday, The New York Times announced that its publisher, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., 66, is stepping down at the end of the year and will be succeeded by his son, 37-year-old Arthur Gregg (A.G.) Sulzberger.

The familial exchange of power wasn’t unexpected. The younger Sulzberger is the sixth member of the Ochs Sulzberger clan to serve as publisher of the prominent New York newspaper. He is a fifth-generation descendant of Adolph S. Ochs, who bought the newspaper in 1896 as it was facing bankruptcy.

The family’s Jewish history — Adolph Ochs was the child of German Jewish immigrants — has often been the subject of fascination and scrutiny, especially during and after World War II, when the paper was accused of turning a blind eye to atrocities against Jews.

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The Little-Known Story That Changed How Jews View the Path to the Redemption

Posted on December 25th, 2017
From IsraelvideoNetwork


Jews have been integrated into their various societies in the exile for thousands of years.

Thousands of Jews were more willing to die than convert out of Judaism, and they continued to pray for the redemption.

The idea of Jews working and trying to speed up the bringing of the redemption came and went over the generations.

Major debates occurred concerning the dawning of the messianic age.

This video is but one of many fascinating stories that dot Jewish history over the centuries.

Watch video.

 

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