Tu B’Shevat 2018

Posted on January 22nd, 2018
myjewishlearning.com


In 2018, the "birthday of the trees" begins at sundown on Tuesday, Jan. 30 and ends at sundown on Wednesday, Jan. 31.


In 2018, the “birthday of the trees” begins at sundown on Tuesday, Jan. 30 and ends at sundown on Wednesday, Jan. 31.

Tu B’Shevat or the “birthday” of all fruit trees, is a minor festival. The name is Hebrew for the 15th of the Hebrew month of Shevat.

In ancient times, Tu B’Shevat was merely a date on the calendar that helped Jewish farmers establish exactly when they should bring their fourth-year produce of fruit from recently planted trees to the Temple as first-fruit offerings

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Find some great ideas on JvillageNetwork's Pinterest page

 

9 Things to Know About the Daf Yomi (Daily Page of Talmud)

Posted on January 15th, 2018
BY ILANA KURSHAN for myjewishlearning.com 


How to participate in the longest-running Jewish book club (even if you can’t read Hebrew).


Are you interested in joining the world’s largest book club?

Daf yomi (pronounced dahf YOH-mee)  is an international program to read the entire Babylonian Talmud — the main text of rabbinic Judaism — in seven and a half years at the rate of one page a day. Tens of thousands of Jews study daf yomi worldwide, and they are all quite literally on the same page — following a schedule fixed in 1923 in Poland by Rabbi Meir Shapiro, the founder of daf yomi, who envisioned the whole world as a vast Talmudic classroom connected by a global network of conversational threads.

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Why the Terms CE and BCE Replaced AD and BC, and Why Jews Care About It

Posted on January 8th, 2018
Philologos, for Mosaic


It’s not why you think.


Viktor Kappel, a reader of Mosaic, writes:

I am a Christian who happens to believe that the Jewish people are indeed God-chosen. Please explain to me, though, why it has become so important to a part of this people to replace AD and BC with CE and BCE. I believe that this is not helpful to the Jewish cause.

As a Jew, I must say that I sympathize with the Jew in the story who, while reciting the words “Thou has chosen us among all people” in the holiday kiddush, stops, raises his arms to heaven, and asks in exasperation, “Why don’t You pick on someone else for a change?” Still, I welcome Mr. Kappel’s question. Since, between this column and my next, 2017 CE or AD will become 2018 AD or CE, it couldn’t have been timelier.

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Jewish Ritual Objects: A Guide

Posted on January 1st, 2018
myjewishlearning.com


From challah covers to yahrzeit candles, what they are used for, how they look and where you can find them.


Jewish practice involves a number of special objects, referred to as ritual objects or Judaica. Many people like to use, or even collect, beautifully crafted objects, honoring the concept of hiddur mitzvah, beautification of the mitzvah.

The objects below are listed in alphabetical order. All can be purchased from most Judaica stores and online. (Prefabricated sukkah s and sukkah-building kits are available for purchase, although many people prefer to build their own.) Most of the objects listed — with the exception of the yad, shofar and Torah scroll, which are generally reserved for synagogue use —are commonly found in Jewish homes.

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God 101

Posted on December 25th, 2017
myjewishlearning.com 


In Judaism, who or what is God?


There is no single Jewish conception of God. God has been described, defined, and depicted in a variety of ways in different works of Jewish literature and at different historical moments.

About God

God is beyond human comprehension, but that has not stopped Jewish thinkers from attempting to describe God. The Jewish God is referred to with many names and euphemisms, though God’s scriptural names are traditionally only pronounced during religious activities. Belief in one God is one of Judaism’s defining characteristics. Nonetheless, some parts of the Torah seem less monotheistic than others. In addition, there are minor currents of thought within Judaism that play down the importance of belief in God.

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